MEXICAN GRAY WOLF

The Mexican gray wolf (canis lupus baileyi) is the smallest and most genetically distinct subspecies of the gray wolf (canis lupus). For centuries, Mexican wolves once inhabited the landscapes of Mexico and the American Southwest. By the mid 1900s, they were effectively pushed to the very brink of extinction. Today efforts are underway to restore this species back to the lands they once inhabited, however many challenges have presented themselves along then way.

Meet the Mexican Gray Wolf from Sawtooth Legacy Films on Vimeo.

Meet the Mexican Gray Wolf
The Mexican gray wolf (canis lupus baileyi) is the smallest and most genetically distinct subspecies of the gray wolf (canis lupus). For centuries, Mexican wolves once inhabited the landscapes of Mexico and the American Southwest. By the mid 1900s, they were effectively pushed to the very brink of extinction. Today efforts are underway to restore this species back to the lands they once inhabited, however many challenges have presented themselves along then way.

Mexican Gray Wolf History

The Mexican wolf was pushed to the very brink of extinction during the mid 1900's as part of a campaign to eradicate wolves from the landscape. The last Mexican wolves in the United States were shot and killed in 1970 in Arizona and Texas, although sightings continued along the border of Mexico. In 1976, the Mexican wolf was listed as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. An effort was made to capture the last remaining "Lobos" in Mexico to begin a Captive Breeding Program. Five wolves were captured, quite possibly the last of their kind, and the captive breeding began. In 1998, 11 captive reared wolves were released into the Blue Range Wolf Recovery Area of Arizona marking the first time in over 30 years wolves roamed the wilderness of the Southwest. Today, roughly 85 call the wild their home.

How Your Donation Helps! $18,000

The Last Pack: Gray Area, Wolves of the Southwest

$18,000 - GRAY AREA: WOLVES OF THE SOUTHWEST. Building community among future leaders of wolf conservation is an important tenet of WERC's outreach. Partnering with Filmmaker Alan Lacy not only provides an opportunity to expand our supporters' education but also provides important cross-promotion of our work. Alan's input and energy are instrumental to our efforts and WERC leadership hopes to grow this important connection as well as identify additional young and social entrepreneurs.  In 2016, we are committed to helping him raise the final $12,000 for his film while resourcing his talent toward our effort, which includes pledge to film and monthly stipend for Alan's WERC-related efforts.